Recent Publications

Initiative Worksheet

from CoCreative
This is one of the worksheets we use in our meetings.  This worksheet is used by initiative groups to flesh out our favority initiative "concepts" to share with the whole working group. Note that in our Key Initiator approach to collective impact, "Working Groups" refers to the large entities and we refer to the small project groups inside Working Groups as "Initiative Groups."  

4 Types of Initiative Groups

from CoCreative
We use four types of initative groups in our working groups to Monitor, Learn, Develop tools and solutions, and Implement and scale solutions.  This sheet describes the four types and the roles and time commitments of participating in each type. Note that in our Key Initiator approach to collective impact, "Working Groups" refers to the large entities and we refer to the small project groups inside Working Groups as "Initiative Groups."  

How Working Groups Work

from CoCreative
Here's general information on the "Key Initiator" approach to collective impact that we use in our supply chain and market transformation working groups. Note that in our Key Initiator approach to collective impact, "Working Groups" refers to the large entities and we refer to the small project groups inside Working Groups as "Initiative Groups."

6 Ways the Working Group Can Work

from CoCreative
Here are 6 "channels for action" that working groups can use to advance and scale solutions.  Note that in our Key Initiator approach to collective impact, "Working Groups" refers to the large entities and we refer to the small project groups inside Working Groups as "Initiative Groups."

4 Brainstorming Techniques

from CoCreative
The old way of brainstorming is dead.   Here are four techniques we use that produce better ideas faster.

Promising Practices in

developmental screening

Students and communities working together to address health determinants

An article by Bainbridge, Grossman, Dharamsi, Porter and Wood from Education for Health, Volume 27 Issue 1 (April 2014). Background: This article presents an innovative model for interprofessional community-oriented learning. The Engagement Studios model involves a partnership between community organizations and students as equal partners in conversations and activities aimed at addressing issue of common concern as they relate to the social determinants of health. Methods: Interprofessional teams of students from health and non-health disciplines work with community partners to identify priority communities issues and explore potential solutions. Results: The student teams work with a particular community organization, combining their unique disciplinary perspectives to develop a project proposal, which addresses the community issues that have been jointly identified. Approved proposals receive a small budget to implement the project. Discussion: In this paper we present the Engagement Studies model and share lessons learned from a pilot of this educational initiative. To download the article click here.

Leadership in Intractable Conflict over Public School Sexuality Education in the United States

Summary of a Grounded Theory Study
My career can be split into two distinct periods.  I began my career in religious work.  During that period I served as an ordained minister within evangelical Christian, and occasionally fundamentalist, traditions.  I held leadership positions in local, state, national, and international organizations and groups.  In the second, and most recent, period of my career I have worked in the field of sexuality education.  Again, I have had the privilege of providing leadership in local, state, national, and international organizations and groups.  Some might interpret these two career periods as having very little, if anything, in common.  In fact, nothing could be further from the truth.  During both periods I worked with young people.  Sometimes my work brought me into daily contact with young people and, at other times, I worked indirectly with them by providing support and assistance to youth serving professionals and organizations.  Additionally, in both periods, I provided sexuality education to young people.  Ideologically, my approach was sometimes “abstinence-only” and sometimes “comprehensive.”  As a result, I can understand both and fluently speak the language of either.  My involvement in the field has also put me in the middle of the conflict over sexuality education in U.S. public schools.    Since my first experience in the conflict, I have been curious about it.  I have not been curious about the issues at the center of the conflict, as those seem quite clear, and have been described very well by others.  Rather, I have been curious about those of us who have provided leadership in and through the conflict.  I have been curious about our motivations to lead and remain in leadership despite the conflict.  I have been curious about how we learn to lead in such a niche field.  I have been curious to know how we understand and relate to the conflict as persons, as well as leaders.  This research has attempted to satisfy this curiosity.    

ARE THERE TOO MANY NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS IN ALBERTA DUPLICATING SERVICES?

2012 Update and Expanded Version
  In Alberta there is a VLT for every 607 Albertans but one social service non-profit for every 1,750 Albertans.  There is a lawyer for every 455 Albertans but one environmental non-profit for every 7,872 Albertans.  There is one restaurant/bar for every 486 Albertans but only one arts and culture non-profit for 1,574 Albertans.  Do we have too many non-profit organizations? If so, what criteria led to that conclusion?  How many non-profits should we have? Who knows the correct number?  *** In 2010 I published a short piece called “Are There Too Many Non-Profit Organizations in Alberta Duplicating Services?” which attempted to increase the public’s understanding of the make-up of the voluntary sector while also challenging the facile notion that so many of society’s problems would be solved if non-profits stopped all their duplication of services. While the focus here is on Alberta, I used national data to construct it and my sense is that general findings for Alberta would be quite similar to other provinces and the overall Canadian experience. My thesis is that duplication is not a problem; it is a must-have.  Let me know what you think. Mark

Situational Leadership & Management

The Agreement Certainty Matrix is a document I produced to describe the different types of community challenges - from simple to complex - and how managers and leaders can work productively in each "situation".